You may be wondering, what causes bladder leaks during or after pregnancy? Are post-baby bladder leaks inevitable? What can be done?  According to the Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, many moms and moms-to-be experience urinary incontinence. The good news is, it’s not inevitable — nor it is something you should just live with. Solutions are in reach!

How does pregnancy cause urinary incontinence?

As many as 4 in 10 women get urinary incontinence during pregnancy.1 During pregnancy, as your unborn baby grows, he or she pushes down on your bladder, urethra, and pelvic floor muscles. Over time, this pressure may weaken the pelvic floor muscles and lead to leaks or problems passing urine.

Most problems with bladder control during pregnancy go away after childbirth when the muscles have had some time to heal. If you’re still having bladder problems 6 weeks after childbirth, talk to your doctor, nurse, or midwife.

How does childbirth cause urinary incontinence?

Problems during labor and childbirth, especially vaginal birth, can weaken pelvic floor muscles and damage the nerves that control the bladder. Most problems with bladder control that happen as a result of labor and delivery go away after the muscles have had some time to heal. If you’re still having bladder problems 6 weeks after childbirth, talk to your doctor, nurse, or midwife.

What can be done?

If you’re pregnant or have recently given birth, be sure to talk to your doctor, nurse or midwife. They are your advocate and are your best source of information and guidance on what to do.

If you are not pregnant and are living with post-baby bladder leaks months or years after childbirth, know that there are many medical options and at home steps to explore. At Pelvital, we encourage your to check out Flyte, our clinically proven, 5-minute per day pelvic floor treatment for stress urinary incontinence.

Learn more about Flyte, a simple, effective in-home treatment.

Source: About Bladder Leaks, Pregnancy & Childbirth content reproduced courtesy The Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, womenshealth.gov, January 31, 2019. Accessed at womenshealth.gov on June 12, 2020.

1 Sangsawang, B., & Sangsawang, N. (2013). Stress Urinary Incontinence in Pregnant Women: A Review of Prevalence, Pathophysiology, and Treatment. International Urogynecology Journal; 24(6): 901–912.